Latest WikiLeaks dump exposes CIA methods to mask malware

WikiLeaks may have dealt another blow to the CIA’s hacking operations by releasing files that allegedly show how the agency was masking its malware attacks.

On Friday, the site dumped the source code to the Marble Framework, a set of anti-forensic tools that WikiLeaks claims the CIA used last year.

The files do appear to show “obfuscation techniques” that can hide CIA-developed malicious coding from detection, said Jake Williams, a security researcher at Rendition InfoSec, who has been examining the files.

Every hacker, from the government-sponsored ones to amateurs, will use their own obfuscation techniques when developing malware, he said.

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from Computerworld News http://www.computerworld.com/article/3187025/security/latest-wikileaks-dump-exposes-cia-methods-to-mask-malware.html#tk.rss_news

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Microsoft to sell Galaxy S8 phones pre-loaded with its own apps

Microsoft will sell Samsung’s newest Android-powered phones, the Galaxy S8 and S8+, in its brick-and-mortar stores next month.

The phones can be pre-ordered now at Microsoft’s retail outlets — but not online — and will also be available for purchase in the stores beginning April 21, Samsung’s release date for the new, larger models. Microsoft’s prices will be the same as Samsung’s: $750 for the Galaxy S8, $850 for the S8+.

But the Galaxy S8 and S8+ phones sold by Microsoft will not be identical to those offered elsewhere. “A Microsoft customization is applied when the devices are unboxed and connected to Wi-Fi,” a Microsoft spokeswoman said in an emailed statement. “This customization ensures customers a best-in-class productivity experience with Microsoft applications such as Office, OneDrive, Cortana, Outlook and more.”

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from Computerworld News http://www.computerworld.com/article/3186939/android/microsoft-to-sell-galaxy-s8-phones-pre-loaded-with-its-own-apps.html#tk.rss_news

Tech to help protect Final Four crowds

At this weekend’s Final Four college basketball tournament, sophisticated technology is in place to help public safety officials monitor crowds, vehicles, social networks and unauthorized drones from a command center at an undisclosed location in downtown Phoenix.

An array of thousands of cameras and other sensors are already in place across public venues and roadways in the Phoenix area. The games will take take place Saturday night and Monday night at the University of Phoenix Stadium in suburban Glendale, Ariz., nine miles from downtown.

In the stadium alone, more than 700 video cameras are likely to be used to monitor vendors and crowds. Thousands more video cameras and motions sensors are ready to watch vehicles on highways and crowds at 20 Final Four special events, at the four hotels where college teams are lodging and in parking areas.

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from Computerworld News http://www.computerworld.com/article/3187004/security/tech-to-help-protect-final-four-crowds.html#tk.rss_news

Google’s Android hacking contest fails to attract exploits

Six months ago, Google offered to pay $200,000 to any researcher who could remotely hack into an Android device by knowing only the victim’s phone number and email address. No one stepped up to the challenge.

While that might sound like good news and a testament to the mobile operating system’s strong security, that’s likely not the reason why the company’s Project Zero Prize contest attracted so little interest. From the start, people pointed out that $200,000 was too low a prize for a remote exploit chain that wouldn’t rely on user interaction.

“If one could do this, the exploit could be sold to other companies or entities for a much higher price,” one user responded to the original contest announcement in September.

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from Computerworld News http://www.computerworld.com/article/3186966/security/googles-android-hacking-contest-fails-to-attract-exploits.html#tk.rss_news

Intel’s Cannonlake PC chip shipments may slip into next year

If you’re expecting to buy laptops with Intel’s next-generation Core chips code-named Cannonlake chips by the end of this year, you may be disappointed.

There’s a chance that shipments of Cannonlake — Intel’s first on the 10-nanometer production process — may slip into next year.

Intel previously said Cannonlake would ship by year end, but that’s now uncertain.

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from Computerworld News http://www.computerworld.com/article/3186853/windows-pcs/intels-cannonlake-pc-chip-shipments-may-slip-into-next-year.html#tk.rss_news