Here’s what your hardware needs for the AWS Greengrass IoT service

Amazon is bringing the Greengrass IoT service to devices and board computers, meant to help boost offline data collection and analysis.

The goal of Greengrass, an AWS software tool, is to make IoT devices and maker boards smarter. Even underpowered devices collecting data won’t be “dumb” anymore, Amazon says.

Amazon has kept in mind that smart devices can’t always be connected to the cloud for data analysis, and Greengrass brings some AWS software tools to devices to aid in better collection and analysis of data.

Developer boards are strongly tied to cloud services, which add more functionality to smart devices. Data collected from sensors are typically dispatched and collected in the cloud, where it can be analyzed and can define the next steps.

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from Computerworld News http://www.computerworld.com/article/3145801/internet-of-things/heres-what-your-hardware-needs-for-the-aws-greengrass-iot-service.html#tk.rss_news

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Amazon will literally truck your data into its cloud

It can be hard moving large amounts of data to the cloud. Even with consistent 10 Gbps of data transfer, it would take years to get hundreds of petabytes from an on-premises data center to a public cloud provider.

Amazon is aiming to speed that process up with a high-capacity data transfer product: A literal truck. The Snowmobile is a big, white semi-trailer that can hold 100PB of data. It will then get driven to an Amazon endpoint, and the data will be loaded into the company’s public cloud storage.

For smaller migrations that can also benefit from processing at the edge, Amazon announced a new Snowball Edge appliance that provides 100TB of storage, local compute power, and migration for handling data transfer and processing.

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from Computerworld News http://www.computerworld.com/article/3146147/cloud-computing/amazon-will-literally-truck-your-data-into-its-cloud.html#tk.rss_news

Enterprises start to migrate critical legacy workloads to the cloud

LAS VEGAS — Now that major enterprises have gotten their feet wet with smaller cloud projects, they’re beginning to focus on migrating large, critical legacy workloads.

That’s the take from Stephen Orban, head of enterprise strategy at Amazon Web Services (AWS).

In an interview with Computerworld at the annual AWS re:Invent conference here this week, Orban said the next wave of cloud computing could be focused strategically on legacy migration.

And while it’s always tougher – and riskier — to move big, mission-critical workloads and services, at least IT departments have gotten experience working with the cloud so they’re not going in cold.

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from Computerworld News http://www.computerworld.com/article/3146133/cloud-computing/enterprises-start-to-migrate-critical-legacy-workloads-to-the-cloud.html#tk.rss_news

New supercomputer will unite x86, Power9 and ARM chips

For once, there will be a ceasefire in the war between major chip architectures x86, ARM and Power9, which will all be used in a supercomputer being built in Barcelona.

The MareNostrum 4 is being built by the Barcelona Supercomputing Center and will have three clusters, each of which will house Intel x86, ARM and Power9 chips. Those clusters will be linked to form a supercomputer that will deliver up to 13.7 petaflops of performance.

All three architectures have never been implemented together in a supercomputer, let alone PCs or servers. It raises questions on how the architectures will work together.

The three chip architectures are fundamentally different. An application written to take advantage of a specific architecture won’t work on another, but server architectures are changing so different types of systems can coexist. Linux supports x86, ARM and Power, so it’s possible to write applications to work across architectures.

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from Computerworld News http://www.computerworld.com/article/3146052/servers/new-supercomputer-will-unite-x86-power9-and-arm-chips.html#tk.rss_news

SSD adoption in laptops exceeds expectations

Even as a shortage of NAND flash has caused prices for the technology to rise, notebook makers are increasingly opting to manufacture their computers to use solid state drives (SSDs) instead of hard disk drives (HDDs), according to a new report.

The number of notebooks built to use SSDs, which are based on NAND flash, exceeded analyst expectations this quarter, and the industry is on pace to surpass the 50% adoption rate in the 2017 to 2018 timeframe, according to a report from DRAMeXchange.

“Irrespective of the undersupply situation in the NAND flash market, the SSD adoption rate in the global notebook market is certain to pass 30% this year. Furthermore, this figure is expected to be above 50% sometime within the 2017 to 2018 period,” said Alan Chen, senior research manager of DRAMeXchange.

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from Computerworld News http://www.computerworld.com/article/3145799/data-storage/ssd-adoption-in-laptops-exceeds-expectations.html#tk.rss_news

Microsoft declares summer’s Windows 10 upgrade fit for business

Microsoft today promoted its Windows 10 August upgrade to the Current Branch for Business release track, putting the “Anniversary Update” in the queue for automatic download and installation on enterprise PCs.

The move will also set in motion a two-month countdown clock on support for the original mid-2015 version of Windows 10.

“Windows 10 1607, also known as the Windows 10 Anniversary Update, has been declared as Current Branch for Business (CBB) and is ready for deployment,” Michael Niehaus, a director of product marketing, said in a post to a company blog that used similar wording to the first upgrade to the CBB. In April, Microsoft moved the November 2015 upgrade to the corporate delivery track.

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from Computerworld News http://www.computerworld.com/article/3146051/windows-pcs/microsoft-declares-summers-windows-10-upgrade-fit-for-business.html#tk.rss_news

Amazon accelerates and simplifies its cloud infrastructure offering

Amazon Web Services continued to push its infrastructure offering forward on Wednesday with the launch of upgrades to its existing instance types and new tools for simplifying and accelerating computation tasks in its public cloud.

AWS CEO Andy Jassy unveiled a new Elastic GPUs feature for the Elastic Compute Cloud (EC2) that will let developers add flexible acceleration using parallel processing for their applications.

On top of that, Amazon launched a new Lightsail service that’s aimed at giving customers an easy way to spin up a straightforward virtual private server without having to orchestrate a fleet of different AWS services. Finally, the company also unveiled upgrades to its burstable, memory intensive, high I/O, and compute intensive instances.

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from Computerworld News http://www.computerworld.com/article/3146049/cloud-computing/amazon-accelerates-and-simplifies-its-cloud-infrastructure-offering.html#tk.rss_news